Golf Tips – Curing a Golf Slice

Golf Tips – Curing a Golf Slice

The most dreaded part of my game has always been hitting a golf slice. Seems like no matter what I do, it always rears it’s ugly head. I’ve tried just about every swing tip possible and after a little time it always creeps back in.

Are you a fellow slicer?

One of those kindred spirits who stands on the tee box, takes about two seemingly perfect practice golf swings, line up to the ball, swing back and knock it down the perfect line.. at first.

Then inevitably, as you knew it would, it starts bleeding, slightly at first eventually evolving into a full 90 degree flight path ending up somewhere that will take a scuba mask or hiking boots to locate..

If you’re like me, than this isn’t a problem that’s isolated to the driver, just about every club in your bag, with the exception of the putter and wedges.

It’s important to identify what causes a golf slice because if you don’t know exactly what you’re doing wrong than all the golf tips in the world won’t help you out much. Simply put, as far as I understand it, there are two main causes of a golf slice. Either you swing from over the top, creating an out to in swing path so the clubface cuts across the ball creating side spin or you’re leaving the clubface open at impact, again creating side spin on the ball.

In my case, it’s the latter, I tend to keep the clubface open at impact. I’m presently using a Nike Str8-Fit Driver that I’ve closed two degrees to help offset the natural tendencies of my swing, but on a bad day, it doesn’t help all that much.

The primary reason that I have a slice is that instead of turning my hips, I tend to slide my hips forward preventing my body from turning the hips out.

If you’ve done any research online, you know that there’s about a million different golf tips out there on fixing a golf slice.

Here’s a couple golf tips I’ve tried and haven’t had much luck with..

  • Tee the ball higher and move it forward more in your stance, giving the clubface more time to finish closing.
  • Concentrate on trying to hit a hook. The emphasis on closing the clubface will help negate the slice.
  • Take a more powerful grip on the club by rotating your hands to the right more (if you’re a righty, left if you’re a lefty). This will cause your clubface to close earlier in the swing, giving you a greater chance of hitting a straight shot.

There’s many more, but off the top of my head, these are some of the quick fixes I’ve tried that have been marginally successful.

I was playing a round of golf the other day and as I feared it would happen, the golf slice reared it’s ugly head on me. After a couple holes of unsuccessfully trying to get it under control,  one of my playing partners (been playing for 30+ years and is a +1) gave me a real quick fix that completely blew my mind, not to mention, totally cured my slice.

I mentioned earlier that I have a tendency to slide my hips forward and his simple solution was to take a wider stance. He said just stand with your feet about another six inches apart and give it a go.

The very next shot was straight as an arrow and after a couple holes, I had to change the angle of my driver from two degrees closed to flush because I started blocking my drives.

That advice completely fixed my golf slice (for the round anyway). As golf tips go, it’s probably the best I’ve ever received. It’s simple to do, takes no practice and there’s virtually no margin for error..

If your symptoms are similar to mine, try spreading your feet apart more and let me know if it helps.

If you’re interested, here’s some other golf tips that might help your game.

  6 comments for “Golf Tips – Curing a Golf Slice

  1. at

    When i was just learning the game, I tought myself to turn a big slice into a big hook. By teaching myself different shots I was able to learn to work it both ways over time, and gained a better understanding of what causes slices and hooks. The best tip I ever got in learning to hit a draw was this:

    When standing at address looking down at the ball, imagine the ball is split into 4 quadrants. To hit a draw, the club has to approach the ball from inside the target line. To do this, I simply tried to hit the bottom right (or southeast) quadrant of the ball. That produces an inside-out swing path and as long as the club face is square to the target line, a draw. See the picture below:

    http://www.intothegrain.com/images/ballquadrants.JPG

  2. at

    Your playing partner is right if your stance is too narrow it is way too easy to get the hips sliding instead of turning.
    If you want to totally eliminate your slice work on the classic Butch Harmon swing. Strong grip, ball on the inside heel, club shy of parallel at the top. Think Tiger 1999, Greg Norman or Adam Scott. I haven’t hit a slice since 1996.

  3. at

    I totally agree with you Bob – good comment.

  4. at

    I struggle with getting the face closed as well, and have actually narrowed my stance over the past couple years. Makes sense that that may let the hips slide too much and contribute to the open face. Something new to try this weekend.

    Oh, and changing your face angle mid-round is against the rules.

  5. at

    Hey Bret, I’m intrigued to see if it helps to correct your slice, keep me posted!

  6. at

    Good Information, thanks. After a life time of playing golf, it is still amazing how, just when you begin to get a little bit complacement and you think you have "cracked" this game..it comes back very sharply and bites you. One of the key elements which catches most people out is the grip pressure. In my experience, when I consciously think about relaxing the grip pressure to around 4 out of 10, (where 10 is a vice-like grip), that is when it I get a really great shot. Straight and long, as the unhinging of a RELAXED grip allows the club head to do what it is designed to do with the weight in the head being allowed to do the work, rather than "forcing" the downswing with the hands. What does anyone else think about this, I would really like to hear from you?

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